Adorable Elderly Man Plays Guitar (#poem)

man playing red and white electric guitar
Photo by Sofia Báthory on Pexels.com

He picks up the guitar and his fingers begin
To glide across the frets and strings.
Decades of muscle memory carry his hands
Through songs and solos that could go for hours
Without repeating or pausing to remember a note.

He was never a household name like the guitar gods
Of arena rock, but he was never hungry, either,
And every dime he earned came from music.
If he wasn’t known to millions of adoring fans,
He was known to thousands of admiring musicians.

He always had a gig and appeared as a session
Musician on hundreds of recordings in genres
As diverse as jazz, classical, R and B, bluegrass,
Rock, funk, and country and western.
He was unassuming but confident and formidable.

As he played, a much younger man watched
With a mixture of envy and admiration and
Recorded on a cell phone. With appropriate permission
Granted, the recording was uploaded to the masses,
Languishing for a few days before catching on and going viral.

To the online world, the veteran performer was reduced
To an adorable elderly gentleman who amazed
The people around him by being able to do what
He had done for the 50 years preceding. His new
Fans felt they had done him a favor by describing him so.

Podiatry’s Failure to Uplift Soles (#poem)

feet legs animal farm
Photo by Gratisography on Pexels.com

“Feet don’t fail me now”
Is a mildly amusing witticism
Until your actual feet begin
To fail in the most literal way.

Maybe it’s nerve damage,
An old injury flaring up,
Or the onset of degenerative
Disease. One thing is certain,
Though. You’ll soon join
The ranks of the aged and
Vulnerable. You’ll soon be
Reliant, dependent, despondent.

Your vanishing vitality is fuel
For the fortunate who have
Not realized mortality stalks
Them in the shadows. Their
Optimism will carry you a bit
Further.

A Belabored Gardening Metaphor (#poem)

shallow focus photography of green leaves
Photo by Suzy Hazelwood on Pexels.com

Fertility varies from place to place.
In my hometown, cilantro would take over
The yard if you weren’t careful. Some
People don’t like the smell, but I loved
The fragrant flood of mulch and pollen
Whenever I mowed. (It was the only joy
I found in mowing.) A cilantro haze
Always encircled by volunteer chilis
Standing as spicy sentinels guarding
The perimeter of the lawn with indifference.

In other places, the peppers and coriander
Do not volunteer but must be coaxed
From the soil with care and determination.
You must remember to bring them inside
During the cold months (and most are).
A grow light helps, too, one would think,
But the natural growth and abundance
Of abandoned plants has left me.

And could anything be more appropriate?
My own vitality, once uncontrolled and
Forever stretching to new patches of
Fertile soil must now be coaxed awake
Each day and issues a constant threat
Of “failure to thrive.” My arthritic hands
And semi-repaired bones strain to put
New seeds in fecund ground and wait for
Life to emerge each spring. But still
The light, the air, the soil trigger some
Urge, some will to unfurl once more.

Salutations for Sally (#poem)

A poem for my wife’s birthday.

Salutations for Sally

 The years don’t pass slowly anymore,

But there’s still time for an eternityIMG_0329

In your eyes, in your arms, your love.

Each moment a step to infinity,

But time doesn’t march, it ascends,

And we rise on the years,

Sadder, yes, but wiser and

More loving, more understanding.

And you lift everything around you

To the stars and beyond.

You are both the zenith and quasar.

And as time dissolves to energy,

I will be your light—particle and wave.

Photons on a joint journey—

Born of a supernova—

In eternal abandon,

We will live forever.

 

Protecting the sexual rights of our grandparents

Bioethicists and experts on aging spend some time advising people on advance directives aimed at helping us make decisions about our medical care in the event of dementia or unconsciousness near the end of our lives. The idea is that we may give prior consent for decisions to be made when consent is not possible. We generally make decisions about what treatments should be offered or withheld in the event of fading autonomy.

Perhaps we should consider a broader range of choices as well. In some cases, a personGrowing-Old-Together-800px with dementia can consent to a variety of activities that might not have seemed appropriate previously. In Holding and Letting Go: The Social Practice of Personal Identities, Hilde Lindemann gives an example of a life-long vegetarian and animal rights activist who ends up in a residential care facility and desperately wants to eat the meat dishes offered his fellow residents. Should his earlier convictions be respected or should his later desires be sated?

Lindemann breaks down the problem by identifying a capacity for two types of volition: primary and secondary. Primary volition is simply the ability to want something. Secondary volition is the ability to want something but think better of it because of overriding desires, which could be based on moral, social, or health concerns (among others). Our resident is able to want a hamburger but not able to think about the ethics of eating meat and how it affects the animals, the environment, or the economy. People who eat meat tend to say it is harmless to give him a hamburger, so his current desires should be indulged. People who care about animals might take a different view.

But what if we weren’t talking about eating meat? Perhaps our resident never cared about animals, but did care about sexual behavior. He may have been prude or strict moralist. Now, however, he would quite like to masturbate frequently and doesn’t mind who sees or knows. In the past, of course, he would have been more discreet, but he has lost the ability to take such concerns into account. Still, it is his body, and he should be able to do what he wants, even if the comfort of other residents and staff must also be considered. When the occasion arises, Mr. X might gently be guided to a private room.

Or he may meet a fellow resident with similar desires. Surely consensual sexual activity, with allowances for the comfort of other residents and staff, should be respected. When younger people have limited autonomy, we are likely to say they are incapable of consent, making sexual relations with them problematic at the least. Such patients are “protected” from sexual advances of any kind, even if they may appear to be willing “victims.”

Rarely is this debate framed as a “right” to sexual pleasure, but sexual puritanism is the only reasonable explanation for the imbalance in the discussion. Surely sexual pleasure is a human drive and a human need. If it isn’t such a strong drive for older patients, it is certainly still a human good. Currently, even the most progressive attitudes toward sexual pleasure for older patients could only be described as polite tolerance rather than accommodation.

To actually accommodate the sexual needs and desires of older, and sometimes demented, patients would require conversations and actions that are sure to make us uncomfortable. It may be possible to discreetly make condoms available to residents in nursing homes, but asking residents whether they might want a vibrator or other sexual aid available is more of a challenge. Involving children and grandchildren in the discussions is likely to be an insurmountable model, at least without a sea change toward sexual behavior in general and among the elderly in particular.

A further difficulty is posed by the possibility of sexual assault or exploitation. Normal guidelines for consent won’t do. A demented patient might consent to sexual activity that would never have occurred in the absence of dementia. The only way to honor the wishes of a patient’s lifelong values is to have difficult discussions earlier in life. We would need to ask question of this nature: “In the event of dementia, what types of sexual pleasure if any would you like to be available to you? What types of sex if any would you consider appropriate with other people? What types of sexual aids if any would you want provided for your pleasure?”

I would caution any young people thinking of completing an advance directive now to reconsider often. As we age, our estimation of what kind of sex lives we will want in old age changes dramatically. Younger people tend to assume that older people naturally lose interest in sex, and I’m sure some do, but many older people find the opposite.

Sexual pleasure has many advantages for older people. It doesn’t cost a great deal of money or effort. While illness and disability can limit sexual options for people of any age, they do not eliminate it. Sexual pleasure doesn’t require one to leave a residential facility, isn’t inherently risky (especially when partners are not involved), and doesn’t necessarily strain the budget (expensive sex toys and porn addictions notwithstanding). In fact, for many older patients, sexual pleasure may be one of a handful of pleasures still available to them.

Some of the risks of sexual behavior are no longer of concern to older patients. While sexually transmitted diseases are still a distinct possibility, many of the diseases seem much less frightening to someone nearing the end of life. Further, pregnancy is no longer a concern, and people who have already lost their spouses are no longer concerned with issues related to fidelity. In ways the young rarely understand, old age is liberating.

Of course, sexual activity of patents has the possibility of creating discomfort for staff. Taking care of a patient should not mean providing sexual services for patients, unless one is specifically hired as a sexual surrogate. Staff must be protected from sexual assault or exploitation. However, feeling squeamish or embarrassed is not the same thing as enduring sexual harassment or assault, and staff must know the difference.

We can make staff more comfortable by becoming more comfortable ourselves with elder sexuality. Normalizing mature sexuality will go a long way toward opening frank and productive discussions of policy and procedures to protect the sexual rights of patients.

Stop infantilizing old people, please

As I write this, I am 55 years old. Like most people my age, I like to think I am a “young 55” or that I look good “for my age.” As I get older, I think I have become a little more patient, more accepting, less doctrinaire, and, yes, sadder and wiser. However, I have not become more adorable, precious, charming, or sweet.

Although I am not yet extremely old, I’ve already noticed that younger people I hardly know sometimes refer to me as “sweetheart” or “sweetie.” This seems to be a particular problem in healthcare settings. Some call it “elderspeak,” which is characterized by treating older people more as children than as fully functioning adults (I personally feel this demeaning language is often inappropriate for children as well, but I will take one thing at a time). For some reason, when people talk to older patients, they tend to slow their speech, raise the volume, and sing their sentences. In addition, every statement seems to become a question and second person pronouns are replaced with first-person plural pronouns ( e.g., “you” becomes “we”). You can read more about this phenomenon here.  At a time when nursing home workers are sharing explicit photos and videos of older adults on social media, complaining about “sweetheart” seems almost quaint, but both the diminutive terms and the more extreme demeaning media rob patients of their dignity and personhood.

Other people seem to think they are honoring older adults by treating them as mascots. Many videos on social media feature adults who are “adorable” or “precious” dancing, singing, or doing other activities they have no doubt done for their entire lives. The videos are presented with the exact same attitude behind videos of kittens, puppies, and babies. Samuel Johnson once said, “A woman’s preaching is like a dog’s walking on his hind legs. It is not done well; but you are surprised to find it done at all.” Videos of the elderly seem to take the same attitude: it is amazing that older people might still do the things they love. If they make the attempt to engage in the activities that make them happy, the are “so cute.”

The consequence of assuming adults become children once again in later life can have serious consequences. For instance, healthcare providers often ignore the sexual health of older patients. As this article states, “prevailing misconceptions among healthcare providers regarding a lack of sexual activity in older adults contribute to making elders an extremely vulnerable population.” The result of this ignorance, is that STD rates among the elderly are increasing at an alarming rate. Although about 80 percent of adults aged 50 to 90 years old are sexually active, they are infrequently screened for STDs.

I am more concerned, though, about the basic harm of a society that treats its elders as mascots for amusement. As we age we lose the respect of our fellow beings and we lose our status as persons. For the most part, younger people don’t mean any harm, even if they are doing harm; they are acting out of ignorance. That being the case, I am here to help. The following are things you should know about your elders:

  1. They have and talk about sex. In a movie, it is always easy to get a good laugh by having an old person, especially an old woman, make any kind of statement that indicates she knows what sex is. Apparently, many young people believe that when you hit a certain age you become an innocent and naïve virgin, completely unaware of how people reproduce.
  2. They curse. This is related to the first point, but it slightly different. If you curse now, you will probably curse in 10 or 30 years. At what point do you think it should become funny or cute? Old people have the same right to words that everyone else has. Language is a human right.
  3. They still know how to do things. It isn’t amazing that someone who has danced since he was seven still likes to cut the rug when he is 80. Our abilities may diminish over time (some do and some don’t), but we don’t suddenly forget everything we’ve learned over a lifetime.
  4. They are still rational and intelligent. I realize we all suffer some cognitive decline as we age and some are affected by diseases that accelerate or accentuate that decline, but young people also suffer brain injury, disease, and other limitations on cognitive ability. Age is not a sufficient reason to believe someone is stupid.
  5. They’ve won the battles you are fighting. Somehow, your elders have survived. If you can manage the same, you should be honored, as you should honor them now. Any old person can tell you it isn’t easy growing old. Someone who has survived had the wits and strength to overcome many adversities. They could teach you a thing or two.
  6. They are persons. Here, I am using the word “persons” in a philosophical sense of someone who bears human dignity and value. It does not diminish as you age. If anyone has value, you do.

In case you haven’t seen any of the videos I described above, here is an example:
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7Br3-5L6hM]